As the implementation of the 2 years Vulture project funded by the USFWS is progressing, the National Association of Nigeria Traditional Medicine Practitioners (NANTMP) are advocating for the adoption of sustainable alternatives to vulture in belief-based use. This agreement was reached last week at a one-day Stakeholders Meeting with the Ogun State Chapter of the Association which was held in Abeokuta on 13th August 2019. According to Chief Soyoye (Aniyikaiye), President of NANTMP Ogun State chapter, the Association is committed to sensitizing its members across the State on desisting from using vulture parts in trado-medicine practices. They also appealed that the government should strengthen the enforcement of existing laws and place the use of the species under Felonious Act, as this will strengthen the enforcement of the ban and reduce vulture trade. Conservation Desk Officer, Ogun State Ministry of Forest, Mr. Ojelade in his response said that lack of law that guides against the trade in vulture use is promoting the illegal trade. He further informed the meeting that Ogun State Government has recently reviewed its Wildlife Laws with the technical support of the Nigerian Conservation Foundation. The draft Wildlife Laws is waiting to be passed by the State House…
Nigeria has for long featured prominently among nations with spectacular landscapes and heritage sites that are of immense significance to biodiversity conservation. These among other factors have earned us global recognition and endeared a host of institutions to embrace animal and plant symbols as its corporate identity. There may be diverse opinions on the values such insignias play in the emergence and growth of business entities. Nevertheless, the use of nature-inspired insignia has facilitated the long-term brand impression, appreciation and patronage received by business owners. Two subspecies of the African Elephants (sometimes considered as 2 separate species) with an estimated population of about 300 individuals are currently living in the wild in Nigeria. The Forest Elephants occupy the lowland tropical forests of Southern Nigeria, while the Savannah Elephants make use of the vast woodland/grassland ecosystems North of the country mostly in protected areas. Efforts to preserve these animals in their home ranges are spearheaded by the Nigerian Conservation Foundation (NCF) and the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) – with support from various State governments, local communities and other corporate bodies. The increasing interests and supports from corporate institutions towards sustainable practices and actions have added to the expansion of conservation influence…
Visit the Lekki Conservation Centre to celebrate with your loved ones. Enjoy nature at it's best!!! 
The need to build the culture of tree planting and re-greening the environment birthed the tree planting project in Udo community, Ovia South-West Local Government Area, Edo State. The Nigerian Conservation Foundation (NCF) in partnership with National Parks Service (NPS) will embark on fruit trees planting in some selected community schools in Edo State. The project will involve planting of fruit trees and setting up of nurseries, as well as conservation clubs in nine (9) schools in Udo community. The pilot phase was conducted on Friday, 19th July 2019 in Obarenren Primary School, Obarenren. Some of the fruit trees planted were avocado, jack fruit, mango, soursop, orange etc. The pupils of the schools will further be engaged on setting up of nurseries, tree planting and other conservation club activities. Dr. Joseph Onoja, Director, Technical Programmes, who led the NCF team stressed the need for every community in Edo State and neighbouring states to adopt tree planting exercise as top priority. Speaking further, he said: “We all know that we need to plant more trees, and there is no better place to start than in the schools.” The school community appreciated the gesture and pledged to nurture the plants while headteachers…
The Nigerian Conservation Foundation (NCF), in partnership with Population Matters, a UK based charity, and with the support of the Lagos State Government, commemorated the World Population Day on Thursday, 11th July 2019 at Lekki Conservation Centre. This maiden edition hosted by the foundation themed Population and sustainability in Nigeria and beyond had on, discuss topics such as population growth and environmental sustainability; overpopulation in the developed world and a global approach; health implication of increasing human population in Nigeria and impact of increasing human population on Lagos environment and possible solution. Some the causes of overpopulation the experts talked about are; Poverty (believed to be the leading cause of overpopulation), illiteracy, lack of family planning, increased birth rates and low mortality rates, male child preference, early marriage, and child brides, immigration, traditions and culture influence, and religious beliefs. The keynote speaker, Barrister Bimbola Salu-Hundeyin, Honourable Commissioner, National Population Commission (NPopC), who was represented by Mrs. Simiat Lawal, Deputy Director, NPopC Lagos observed that overpopulation affect human health especially the vulnerables. She stated that “It is my expectation that all stakeholders will continue to work together and harder to achieve the noble objectives of making life worth living for the…
Why should Nigeria lose its mangrove pride to lack of sustainable lifestyle and negligence of the environment, when the nation should actually benefit immensely from its services if well harnessed? As the world commemorates the International Day for the Conservation of the Mangrove Ecosystem, the Nigerian Conservation Foundation (NCF) is using this moment to call on all the stakeholders to rise to the issues affecting our mangroves. Nigeria has one-third of the entire mangroves in Africa. This is the largest in the continent and the third-largest in the entire world. The Niger Delta Mangroves are estimated to provide 60% of the spawning grounds of fishes in West Africa. Mangroves absorb carbon and they determine the livelihood of the coastal dwellers. Nigerian Mangroves make up 40% of the remaining original forests in Nigeria and cover 10,500 square kilometres. Mangrove degradation is being caused by oil pollution, firewood cutting, over-exploitation, and sand filling among other factors. NCF and other environmental NGOs have embarked on Mangrove Restoration projects to restore Nigeria’s mangrove to at least 70% of their original states. There is an urgent need for rehabilitation for the mangrove ecosystem to be stepped up if they are to continue to render services…
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