The Nigerian Conservation Foundation (NCF), in partnership with its BirdLife International partner in UK, the Royal Society for the Protection of Birds (RSBP), has established a multi-stakeholder committee to address the alarming declines of migratory landbirds in Nigeria. The committee named "Nigerian National Committee on Migratory Landbirds" comprises representatives of Federal Ministry of Environment, A.P. Leventis Ornithological Research Institute, National Park Service, Nigerian Conservation Foundation and Leventis Foundation and is chaired by Dr. Elizabeth Ehi-Ebewele, a Director in the Federal Ministry of Environment. The committee will develop strategy and action plans towards the conservation of migratory landbirds in Nigeria through sustainable management of agricultural and natural resources, promoting policy solutions to relevant Ministries, State, Local Governments or Communities on issues concerning migratory landbirds, identifying research needs relating to migratory landbirds and supporting public awareness on migratory landbirds among others. At its first meeting held in Abuja, the committee pledged to work to reverse the decline in this group of birds by working with government and conservation experts around public awareness and education, policy advocacy and scientific research. “I believe this committee is a very timely intervention that will significantly support the conservation of these special birds, and will also support…
The Nigerian Conservation Foundation (NCF) has signed an agreement with the International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA) on conservation and protection of biodiversity. The Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) was signed by the Director General of NCF, Mr. Adeniyi Karunwi and Deputy Director General, Partnerships and Capacity Development, IITA, Dr. Kenton Dashiell. The two organisations will be undertaking the following in the next five years: Exchange of scientific information and development of specific cooperative programs and projects, especially in the areas of Ornithological Bird Monitoring; Forest Restoration/Reforestation. Seed collection of the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) Red-List trees. Propagation and ex-situ conservation of ‘at risk’ plant species, especially trees. Vegetation surveys & assessments. Development of joint funding proposals. Participatory management of IITA Forest Reserve for conservation of threatened species among others. The terms of the partnership between the two organizations also cover regular exchange of ideas and capacity building for staff in the areas of integrated forest management and protection of endangered species (both plants and animals). For several years, the IITA Forest Project and the Nigerian Conservation Foundation (NCF) have been collaborating on Schools Conservation Clubs in the Ibadan-Ilesa-Osogbo area, and on bird monitoring as required by the…
The African Parks in conjunction with the Rwandan Development Board has successfully ` translocated seven Lions from South Africa into Akagera National Park in Rwanda. The Lions arrived safely late on Tuesday night. They were immediately released into a specially erected 1,000m² boma in the park, the perimeter of which includes a three-metre high, chain-linked electrified fence. The two males and five females are being quarantined in the boma for a minimum of 14 days, after which they will be released into the wilderness of the park. Click here to read more.
The African Parks in conjunction with the Rwandan Development Board has concluded arrangements to translocate seven lions from South Africa into Akagera National Park in Rwanda. The loin species will be reintroducing to the national park as part of effort to restore Rwanda National Parks to their former biodiversity splendour. Lions became extinct in Akagera 15 years ago when numbers of the species were poisoned by cattle herders in the years following the 1994 genocide when the park was unmanaged. Read more here...
Three anti-poaching patrol men in Garamba National Park in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) were killed by a group of heavily-armed poachers, believed to be South Sudanese on 17 June, 2015. The three men were members of a reinforcement team that was deployed to an area inside Garamba. They include Garamba ranger, Jean-Marie Kpionyeslinani, and two members of the Congolese armed forces who were assisting with anti-poaching patrols in the park, Corporal Kambale Musubao and Lieutenant Moise Mospado. A second ranger was injured in the attack, although not seriously. A statement released by the African Parks said that the team was deployed using the African Parks helicopter to an area inside Garamba, approximately 15 kilometres from the park headquarters at Nagero, to support a ground team that had an initial exchange of fire with the poachers. According to Peter Fearnhead , CEO of the African Parks, the three men sustained multiple bullet wounds and died instantly. They were buried on 18 June, 2015. Feamhead added that Ranger Jean-Marie Kpionyesilani left his wife and five children, Corporal Musubao left his wife while Lieutenant Mospado left his wife and seven children. Garamba’s rangers, the Congolese army as well as members of…
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