NCF News

NCF News (6)

NCF Eid-el-Kabir ecards

Written by Friday, 01 September 2017 08:39

Happy Eid-el-Kabir! Celebrate with friends and family by sending one of our Eid-el-Kabir ecards. Choose from one of the ecards below and click on the image to download it. Add the downloaded image as an attachment to your email, add your message and send.

 

 

 

Wetlands are not waste lands rather, they are wealth lands that play significance role in poverty alleviation. They are life wires to many economic activities such as crop cultivation, fishing, livestock rearing etc.

These were the words of  the Project Manager, Living on the Edge, Nigeria, Mohammed Garba Boyi at the World Wetland Day (WWD) celebration organized by the Nigerian Conservation Foundation Living on the Edge Project (LotE) sponsored by Aage Jensen Charity Foundation in partnership with Birdlife International under the Wildlife Club of Africa Phase II Project.

Mohammed, who delivered a key note address titled Values and Services rendered by Wetlands Ecosystem in the Sahel, said that celebrating the 2013 WWD at the Hadejia-Nguru wetlands (the first Ramsar site in Nigeria) was of great significance to promote awareness on its immense benefit to biodiversity and livelihood support in the community.

He expressed worry on the danger that the ecosystem faced in the area as a result of natural and human induced factors such as, drought, unsustainable harvest of resources, and colonization by invasive species.

While highlighting efforts being made to curtail the menace of the threats, Mohammed said the Living on the Edge Project embarked on raising/creating awareness on the need to conserve the wetlands ecosystem, also in collaboration with the communities of Moyori, Kumaganam and Kaska, the project has planted about 15,000 tree seedlings on an estimated total land of about 16,000 hectares. The activity was conducted to specifically reduce the threat of desertification in the area.”

“In Adiani and Buturiya, the project collaborated with government agencies and the communities to draft a management plan for the forest and the wetlands reserve that exists in the two sites respectively and also provided support to communities to engage in some income generating activities such as Bee keeping, poultry farming, mat making and production of fuel efficient wood stove. In Garbi and Buraburin the project supported the communities with tools and other incentives to fight the menace of the Typha grass (kachalla), where Maikwangoli Channel was cleared and free from typha blockage.

The Hadejia – Nguru Wetlands supports about 1.5 million farmers, herders and fishermen. It was estimated that over 300,000 cattle spend the peak of the dry season in the wetlands and 6% of the Nigeria’s inland fresh water fish catch is from the Hadejia – Nguru Wetlands”, he added. He added that the wetlands ecosystem was facing serious threats as a result of natural and human induced factors such as, drought, unsustainable harvest of resources, and colonization by invasive species. Benefits obtained from regulation of ecosystem processes such as Air

The WWD is celebrated yearly on 2 February. The date was adopted at a Convention on Wetlands that was done on 2 February 1971, in the Iranian city of RAMSAR on the shores of the Caspian Sea. The theme for this year’s celebration is “Wetlands take care of Water”

Part of the celebration of the event by the Nigerian Conservation Foundation was a Bird expedition to Oxbow-Lake sector on the Chad Basin National Park, Dagona Waterfowl Sanctuary, Yobe State, conducted for the School conservation Club Members.  The expedition was aimed at creating and building necessary skills on bird watching; identification, binocular use; with mentorship from adult birdwatcher.

The need to take practical action aiming at reducing food waste and save the environment has been reiterated by the environmentalists including children.

According to the group of conservationists who gathered at the 2013 Flora and Fauna Fancy Dress Competitions in Lagos in continuation of the World Environment Day Celebration, reducing food waste will go a long way to   save money and resources, minimize environmental impacts and, most importantly, move towards a world where everyone has enough to eat.

With the support from the MTN Nigeria Communication, Fidelity Bank and the Nigerian Bottling Company, some conservationists and students from different schools in Lagos gathered at the Lekki office of the Nigerian Conservation to celebrate the annual event with the theme “Think, Eat and Save - Reduce your footprint".

The theme of the year aimed at discouraging the wastage of food and to promote food loss campaign while urging people to reduce their food print.

The special guest at the occasion, Mrs. Obayomi Balogun in her speech said that a recent assessment indicates that crop damage from the 2012 flooding in Nigeria was more severe than initially reported. As a result, 2012/13 staple food production may be as much as 12 percent lower than November 2012 estimates. In a country where more than half the population lives below poverty level, this is indeed an alarming report.

"In the light of this, it is obvious that we all need to begin to evaluate our lifestyles, become more conscious of the impacts of the food choices we make, rethink our options and see how we can reduce the problem of food wastage in our environment.  Making informed decision therefore means sustainable consumption. ‘Doing more and better with less,’ through reducing resource use, degradation and pollution while increasing the quality of life for all. We all need to take practical actions “whether at home, on the farm, in the supermarket, in a canteen, in a hotel or anywhere else where food is prepared and consumed.” Such practical actions include buying only what you need, taking only what you can eat, re-using left -over food, buying locally.

In their presentations with different costumes to depict the theme of the year, the children persuaded   people to think before eating and hence contributing in saving the environment.

The participating students in different age categories competed in poems and in Flora and Fauna Fancy Dress Competitions to create awareness on food wastage. The presentations were centered on the need to take corrective measures right from homes to reduce food wastage by imbibing the culture of saving and eating sustainably.

The students went home with various prizes and awards for their brilliant performance at the event.

Speaking earlier on the competition, the Chairman of NCF National Executive Council, Ambassador Hamzat Ahmadu said ""Flora and Fauna Fancy Dress Competition is one of the segments of the NCF World Environment Day School Competitions. I am particularly delighted with the impact this effort has been creating over the years, part of which is the replication of the idea by few environmental NGOs in Nigeria.

Let me use this medium to express our profound gratitude to all our various partners: MTN, Fidelity Bank Plc and the Nigerian Bottling Company (NBC) for making today a reality.

As we are celebrating the World Environment Day today in the pleasant ambience of the Lekki Conservation Centre (LCC), we must be mindful to appreciate Chevron Nigeria Limited for their continued support to the Centre over the years.

We are also seeking more partners in conservation for our laudable environmental education programmes. This we are sure will help strengthen the force that drives our core environmental initiatives and also make it more impactful to the Nigerian populace.”

The Nigerian Conservation Foundation joined the rest of the world to celebrate the 2013 World Environment Day.

With the support from the Nigerian LNG Limited, students from different schools in Bonny Island Community in Rivers State gathered at the Banquet Hall of LNG on June 5, 2013 to celebrate the annual event with the theme “Think, Eat and Save".

This year's theme is aimed at discouraging the wastage of food and to promote food loss campaign while urging people to reduce their food print.

In their presentations with different costumes to depict the theme of the year, the children persuaded   people to think before eating and hence contributing in saving the environment.

The participating students in different age categories competed in poems and in fauna and flora dress competitions to create awareness on food wastage. The presentations were centered on the need to take corrective measures right from homes to reduce food wastage by imbibing the culture of saving and eating sustainably.

The students went home with various prizes and awards for their brilliant performance at the event.

Lagos Bird-Watching Challenge

Written by Wednesday, 31 July 2013 21:41

The Lekki Bird Club and the Nigerian Field Society invite interested bird watchers of all experience levels to join in a 6 to 12 hour team bird spotting competition.  The purpose of the event is to promote bird watching, awareness of the environment, and protection of local habitat.

The competition will begin and end at the Lekki Conservation Center (LCC) along the Lekki-Epe Expressway. Teams of 3 to 5 members can compete in the full 12 hours (two half days) or a shorter 6 hour (half-day) competition. Individuals that do not have a team will be paired with a group to enable participation. The team that spots the most species of wild free living birds will be declared winners.

Birding will take place within the boundaries of 3 designated geographic locations that represent various habitats (Lekki Conservation Center, National Theatre and Tarkwa Bay).  All sightings are restricted to the competition hours.

To sign up and obtain a full set of the competition rules and the official Lagos bird species checklist, contact either Bunmi Jegede with the Lekki Bird Club (LBC)  This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or Steve This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Please save the dates in your calendar.

The Nigerian Conservation Foundation (NCF) has commended the Federal Government of Nigeria for releasing N10 Billion for the commencement of the implementation of the Great Green Wall Project.

The Minister of the Environment, Hajiya Hadiza  Mailafia recently at the National Conference on Environment in Makurdi, Benue State, stated that the Federal Government has made a commitment of N10 billion towards the implementation of the United Nations-backed programme.

Great green wall brings together 11 countries to plant trees across Africa to literally hold back the Sahara desert with a swathe of greenery, lessen the effects of desertification and improve the lives and livelihoods of communities.

In Nigeria, the project aims to address desertification, enhance natural resource management and promote ecosystem integrity in the dryland in the Northern parts of the Country. The Nigerian Project stretches from Zamfara and Kebbi States in the North West corner along the northern border of Nigeria to the extreme eastern border in Borno State. Eight States are involved in the Project.

While commending the Government for the great effort made and its commitment towards the initiative, the Nigerian Conservation Foundation calls for the following strategies to be employed before and during the implementation to achieve a maximum result:

  • A National Institutional Framework for Project Implementation should be very definitive and focused. We suggest that the Framework takes into consideration the expected benefits and elements that the Project should capture.
  • This multi-purpose Project needs strategic approach to implementation. NCF demands effective follow up and action based on the principles and actions highlighted in the Strategic Plan.
  • The Project should be seen as an opportunity to boost natural resource productivity and reduce stress and tension in natural resource use among major stakeholders. However, a conflict mitigation and management strategy should be put in place by participating States so as to guide against actions that can punctuate or slow down the process of implementation in the participating States. The Project should be seen as a solution rather than a problem for communities, States and people of the benefiting areas.
  • Science and Adaptive Field Research should be inculcated into the implementation plan of the project. This should be fashioned out in collaboration with key Universities and Research institutions in the project implementation areas.
  • The project demands a multi-faceted approach to capture essential benefits and involve all major and other necessary stakeholders. Community involvement in project planning and participation is crucial. Major Resource User Groups should be seen as actors and not only receivers of process in the project planning and implementation.


The wall, an initiative spearheaded by African heads of State, will stretch about 7,000 from Senegal in the west to Djibouti in the east and will be about 15 Kilometres wide as it traverses the continent, passing through Mauritania, Mali, Burkina Faso, Niger, Nigeria, Chad, Sudan, Ethiopia and Eritrea.

The programme aims to support the efforts of local communities in the sustainable management and use of forests – a key theme of the tenth session of the UN Forum on Forests (UNFF10), currently taking place in Istanbul – as well as other natural resources in dry lands.

Among other things, the planting of trees is expected to provide a barrier against desert winds and will help to hold moisture in the air and soil, allowing agriculture to flourish. It is also expected that the Wall will reduce erosion, enhance biodiversity and improve countries’ resilience to climate change.

NCF, being the foremost and oldest environmental protection NGO in the country has been witness to similar government/donor projects in the past, which unfortunately, through neglect and improper implementation, often excluding community participation/ownership, became dismal failures, allowing the sands of the desert to ravage thousands of square kilometers of former pasture lands, turning them into uninhabitable desert and hundreds of thousands of pastoralists into environmental refugees, thus greatly exacerbating the grave insecurity scenarios in this region that we are faced with today. We would like to believe that such neglect and indolence in implementation would not be allowed to befall this extremely laudable green wall project and that together with our other neighboring states; we would be able to find a permanent solution to the ravaging environmental disaster of desertification.